Tag Archives: coping skills

Depression or Anger?

I  have been reading various comments from several different Strokes, Brain Injuries and Aphasia  online Support Groups and realized the commonality is Depression.   A person  will outwardly seem to be in a state of self-isolation, and may have unusual sleeping or eating habits.  After reading journals and speaking with experts I have finally realized depression can be a result of ANGER.  Most people hold their anger in, and after reading and speaking to people in depression their anger can cause the depression.  Stroke survivors, Aphasiacs, Brain injury survivors live in a world of the unknown –

  • fear of another stroke or TIA
  • the ups and downs of rehabilitation
  • frustration
  • coping skills
  • Why me?
  • Disappointment in family or friends – not understanding “you should feel better by now”, “just get over it”, “the rolling eyes when you are using your coping skill” and my all time favorite “stop babying yourself”.

How to deal with anger;  Allow  yourself to feel the anger and think about the best approach to deal with these people – do not get emotional – the anxiety could make you ill.  Write a letter expressing your anger – but do not send it.  Counseling, meditation, and medications can be helpful.   If you begin to feel like hurting yourself such as falling down stairs talk to someone. These are natural feelings for people with depression/anger.

Think of these people/comments as nuisances. You had the courage and perseverance to work through your trauma.  You are the hero, they are just ignorant.

 

 

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Filed under Aphasia, Brain injury, Encouragement, Human spirit, inspirational, perseverance, Stroke

Last week I visited the Northeast Rehabilitation  Hospital at Pease International  Tradeport in  Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  It is a beautiful facility  with a welcoming and compassionate speech pathology staff. I was invited  to speak to their Stroke and Brain Injury Support Group.  They were a wonderful group of people who listened intently and offered a wealth of information.. The question/answer and discussion segment was enlightening, their stories and accomplishments were outstanding.  We shared our difficulties concerning aphasia, coping skills,  the feeling of isolation, and the awkward feeling of being “different.”  We discussed how the stroke/brain injuries  gave us a  new life which we should enjoy to the fullest.  We decided to discard the ‘old baggage’ and eliminate people from our  life who make us uncomfortable.    I was asked what I missed the most after my stroke; my response was an emotional moment – teaching.  As the group was leaving a lovely woman approached me in tears. She also was a teacher who desperately needed to teach again.  We brainstormed and arrived at some possibilities for her to return to the world of education. She hugged me as we both  cried for our loss of teaching abilities and  new ideas to be part of the education system again including writing lesson plans and up dating curriculum. We both departed with a sense of hope and thoughts of beginning her new life.  Support groups  can change lives – join one to listen and share. You will definitely feel better.

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May 19, 2015 · 6:56 pm

Silent and Listen

Silent and listen are  key elements within a  conversation.  This is especially true for people with aphasia.  Background noise distracts and can cause confusion for the person with aphasia.  Both parties need to listen in able to comprehend what is being said and to understand each other.  There will be moments when the person with aphasia needs more time to comprehend or respond to your comments – silence on your part is extremely helpful for the person with aphasia. It allows them to collect their thoughts and respond. Ironically there is a commonality to Silent and Listen in all conversations

 SILENT and LISTEN share the same letters. 

 

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Filed under Aphasia, Brain injury, conversations, Encouragement

Aphasia Medical Card

Imagine being in a car accident or a bad fall.  You are semi-conscious and cannot reply to questions referring to your medical conditions or your medications.  Eventually you regain consciousness and respond to these questions but you are stressed, in pain and cannot remember all your medications and most important your allergies. Imagine being a person with aphasia who under this stress cannot communicate any information.   These scenarios occur frequently in the Emergency Rooms everyday.

The solution is YOU.  Carry a card with your name, address, medical condition, allergies, medications, surgeries, and emergency contacts.  People, especially with aphasia, should carry a card/paper similar to this example:

Medical Condition
Aphasia
Name:
Address: 
Telephone #
I have suffered a stroke or head injury resulting in Aphasia. Aphasia means it is difficult for me to speak clearly, read or write, especially under pressure. Please speak slowly and clearly and allow me time to respond. Thank you.

Emergency Contact:

Medications:

Prior surgeries:  For example if you have a pacemaker you cannot have a MRI

ALLERGIES Continue reading

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Filed under Aphasia, Medications

Sick of Stress or does Stress make you sick?

That is the topic on ” Sharing Experiences – Knowledge is Power” on Toginet  Thursday @ 11am.  

Thank you to my listeners.

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Filed under Aphasia, Stroke